Search Results for: dyscalculia toolkit

Dyscalculia Toolkit

Get Your Dyscalculia Toolkit Today

Extensive research has shown that children learn best when they are engaged and having fun. That’s why every activity in this guide is designed for children to have fun while learning to do math.

This is especially important for the child who has dyscalculia!

The conundrum is that children with dyscalculia need to practice more than their peers – but they hate doing math. Since self-esteem develops around the same time a child learns to read and do math, children with math trouble face a two-pronged attack on their self-esteem.

In this book, you’ll find activities to be used over and over again to help improve math skills at all levels.

Now you can:

  • Help your child if s/he has trouble with addition and subtraction
  • Learn great ways to teach measurement, money and time
  • Improve communication with your children
  • Use singing as a mathematics tool
  • Play games that really build self-esteem and improve all kinds of math skills
  • Get your kids excited about school

You’ll find these solutions and more in this instructional guide, brought to you by the authors of the award-winning book, Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids, by Drs. Linda and Alvin Silbert. Sign up for our newsletter and get not only the Dyscalculia toolkit, but the Dyslexia and Dysgraphia toolkits as well.

Grab your copies today!


 

About the Authors

Linda and Al SilbertLinda & Al Silbert have dedicated over thirty-five years to the growth and enhancement of children’s intellectual, emotional, and social development. The Silberts have written over forty books for children in kindergarten through college which have sold over one million copies.

They lecture and lead workshops to help children succeed in school and beyond and have appeared on radio and television throughout the U.S. and Canada. As directors of the Strong Learning Centers based in Chappaqua, New York, they continue to collaborate as writers and educational therapists. The Silberts have two grown children and two grandchildren. They live in the suburbs of New York.
Read what parents, educators, and medical professionals say about the Silberts:

“Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids” by Drs. Linda and Al Silbert looks at how to help educate your child in a whole new way. I first became familiar with their work when a friend recommended them to me years ago.

Their user-friendly approach to helping children was so good, I found that I could actually help my kids. What’s great about their philosophy is that it not only strengthens whatever academic weakness your child has, be it English, science or math, but it takes his or her learning and organizational skills to a new level. -from the Foreword, Al Roker, NBC Today show

“Drs. Linda and Alvin Silbert use the wisdom gained over many years of experience to help parents nurture their children to become better students and, more importantly, to lead happier and more fulfilling lives. By seeing the complete child, Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids focuses not just on better grades, but on a better life for your child.” –Kevin T. Kalikow, M.D., Psychiatrist, Author of Your Child in the Balance.

“Self-esteem is critical to success in life. Linda and Al share practical action steps parents can take now to promote a positive image-whether the child is a toddler or teenager.” –Daniel F. Joynt, Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education, Western Connecticut State University

“Real-life advice on how your child can do better in school in language we can all understand. An excellent book.” –Linda Selvin, Executive Director, New York Branch, International Dyslexia Association

“All parents want to raise happy, successful kids. With the S + T + R + O + N + G method, parents can improve communication, encourage their children, and guide them towards achievement.” –Marc E. Childs, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, New York Medical College

dyslexia toolkit

Get Your Dyscalculia Toolkit Today

In One Simple Step

Extensive research has shown that children learn best when they are engaged and having fun. That’s why every activity in this guide is designed for children to have fun while learning to do math.

This is especially important for the child who has dyscalculia!

The conundrum is that children with dyscalculia need to practice more than their peers – but they hate doing math. Since self-esteem develops around the same time a child learns to read and do math, children with math trouble face a two-pronged attack on their self-esteem.

In this book you’ll find activities to be used over and over again to help improve math skills at all levels.

Now you can Discover how to

  • What to do if your child has trouble with addition and subtraction
  • Learn great ways to teach measurement, money and time
  • Improve communication with your children
  • Use singing as a mathematics tool
  • Play games that really build self-esteem and improve all kinds of math skills
  • Get your kids excited about school

 

Grab your copy today

Dyscalculia Diagnosis

If you’ve been given a dyscalculia diagnosis, and this is all new to you – don’t fret. The only thing you have to know now is that learning math is going to take a few extra steps. But the treatment can often be more fun, and lead you to a greater appreciation of math than the dyscalculia diagnosis could ever have foretold. [Read more…]

Dyscalculia Screener: Questions to ask

There’s no good way to diagnose dyscalculia in an online quiz, but these dyscalculia screener questions should help you decide if you should seek additional help. [Read more…]

Dyscalculia: Treatment that works

We’re huge fans of fun. Dyscalculia treatment doesn’t have to be hard, or boring, or long. . .it can actually be fun.

One of the reasons we wrote the dyscalculia toolkit (and why we give it away free) is because once kids understand that there are other ways to learn math – they begin to open up. [Read more…]

Dysgraphia Toolkit

Get Your Dysgraphia Toolkit Today!

Extensive research has shown that children learn best when they are engaged and having fun. That’s why every activity in this guide is designed for children to have fun while learning to write.

This is especially important for the child who has dysgraphia!

The conundrum is that children with dysgraphia need to practice more than their peers – but they hate to write. Since self-esteem develops around the same time a child learns to read and write, children with writing trouble face a two-pronged attack on their self-esteem.

In this book you’ll find activities to be uses over and over again to help improve writing skills at all levels.

Now you can:

  • Help your child if s/he has trouble writing
  • Build a stronger focus on the topic (make it fun) than on the writing itself
  • Improve communication with your children
  • Play games that really build self-esteem and improve writing skills
  • Get your kids excited about school

Sign up for our newsletter and download your copy of the Dysgraphia Toolkit today! While you’re there, grab the Dyslexia and Dyscalculia Toolkits, too!

Grab your copies today!


 

About the authors

Linda and Al SilbertLinda & Al Silbert have dedicated over thirty-five years to the growth and enhancement of children’s intellectual, emotional, and social development. The Silberts have written over forty books for children in kindergarten through college which have sold over one million copies.

They lecture and lead workshops to help children succeed in school and beyond and have appeared on radio and television throughout the U.S. and Canada. As directors of the Strong Learning Centers based in Chappaqua, New York, they continue to collaborate as writers and educational therapists. The Silberts have two grown children and two grandchildren. They live in the suburbs of New York.
Read what parents, educators, and medical professionals have said about Dr. Linda and Dr. Al’s books:

“Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids” by Drs. Linda and Al Silbert looks at how to help educate your child in a whole new way. I first became familiar with their work when a friend recommended them to me years ago. Their user-friendly approach to helping children was so good, I found that I could actually help my kids. What’s great about their philosophy is that it not only strengthens whatever academic weakness your child has, be it English, science or math, but it takes his or her learning and organizational skills to a new level. -from the Foreword, Al Roker, NBC Today show

“Drs. Linda and Alvin Silbert use the wisdom gained over many years of experience to help parents nurture their children to become better students and, more importantly, to lead happier and more fulfilling lives. By seeing the complete child, “Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids” focuses not just on better grades, but on a better life for your child.” –Kevin T. Kalikow, M.D., Psychiatrist, Author of

“Your Child in the Balance” “Self-esteem is critical to success in life. Linda and Al share practical action steps parents can take now to promote a positive image-whether the child is a toddler or teenager.” –Daniel F. Joynt, Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education, Western Connecticut State University

“Real-life advice on how your child can do better in school, in language we can all understand. An excellent book.” –Linda Selvin, Executive Director, New York Branch, International Dyslexia Association

“All parents want to raise happy, successful kids. With the S+ T + R +O+ N +G method, parents can improve communication, encourage their children, and guide them towards achievement.” –Marc E. Childs, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, New York Medical College

Dyslexia Dysgraphia Dyscalculia

Dyslexia Dysgraphia Dyscalculia

I bet for most of you dyslexia is the only one you’ve heard of.  And if I added dyspraxia to the list, it would sound even odder, right? Well, unfortunately there are hundreds of thousands of people who’ve learned they suffer from these learning disorders.

Learning Disorders is the label they’ve been given because early on, they primarily affected students in typical classroom environments. And someone somewhere decided that if you can’t learn in a typical classroom environment, you must have a disorder.

What they probably didn’t know is that you don’t have a disorder at all, [Read more…]

Dyslexia Toolkit

Get Your Dyslexia Toolkit Today!

Extensive research has shown that children learn best when they are engaged and having fun. That’s why every activity in this guide is designed for children to have fun while learning to read.

This is especially important for the child who has dyslexia!

The conundrum is that children with dyslexia need to practice more than their peers, but they hate to read because it’s hard. Since self-esteem develops around the same time a child learns to read, children with reading trouble face a two-pronged attack on their self-esteem.

 

Now you can:

  • Help your child if s/he’s struggling with reading
  • Build a strong phonics foundation
  • Improve communication with your children
  • Employ singing as a reading tool
  • Play games that really build self-esteem and improved reading skills
  • Get your kids excited about school

For regular information about dyslexia and other learning challenges, sign up for our newsletter and download the Dyslexia Toolkit right now! While you’re there, grab the Dyscalculia and Dysgraphia Toolkits as well.

About the Authors

Linda & Al Silbert have dedicated over thirty-five years to the growth and enhancement of children’s intellectual, emotional, and social development. The Silberts have written over forty books for children in kindergarten through college which have sold over one million copies.

They lecture and lead workshops to help children succeed in school and beyond and have appeared on radio and television throughout the U.S. and Canada. As directors of the Strong Learning Centers based in Chappaqua, New York, they continue to collaborate as writers and educational therapists. The Silberts have two grown children and two grandchildren. They live in the suburbs of New York.

 

Read what parents, educators, and medical professionals have said about the Silberts:

Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids by Drs. Linda and Al Silbert looks at how to help educate your child in a whole new way. I first became familiar with their work when a friend recommended them to me years ago. Their user-friendly approach to helping children was so good, I found that I could actually help my kids. What’s great about their philosophy is that it not only strengthens whatever academic weakness your child has, be it English, science or math, but it takes his or her learning and organizational skills to a new level. -from the Foreword, Al Roker, NBC Today show

“Drs. Linda and Alvin Silbert use the wisdom gained over many years of experience to help parents nurture their children to become better students and, more importantly, to lead happier and more fulfilling lives. By seeing the complete child, Why Bad Grades Happen to Good Kids focuses not just on better grades, but on a better life for your child.” –Kevin T. Kalikow, M.D., Psychiatrist, Author of Your Child in the Balance.

“Self-esteem is critical to success in life. Linda and Al share practical action steps parents can take now to promote a positive image-whether the child is a toddler or teenager.” –Daniel F. Joynt, Ph.D., Professor of Counselor Education, Western Connecticut State University

“Real-life advice on how your child can do better in school, in language we can all understand. An excellent book.” –Linda Selvin, Executive Director, New York Branch, International Dyslexia Association

“All parents want to raise happy, successful kids. With the S+ T + R +O+ N +G method, parents can improve communication, encourage their children, and guide them towards achievement.” –Marc E. Childs, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, New York Medical College

Dyscalculia Symptoms Why Can’t My Kid Do Simple Math?

If you change the name, is this a familiar scenario at your house?

“Jessica, you’re so careless. You do this all the time. Look, you failed the test because you added when you were supposed to subtract. Didn’t you see the minus sign? Then you multiplied 6×7 and put 40. You even wrote 54 instead of 31 when you recopied your answer onto the next page. What’s wrong with you?”

Jessica isn’t really careless. She’s got classic dyscalculia symptoms, a math disorder. Unfortunately, characteristics of dyscalculia are often not picked up as being a math disorder. [Read more…]

Famous People with Dyslexia

“As I sat with my tutor, struggling to read this To Kill a Mockingbird book,  I can’t help buy sweat and grit my teeth. Will this ever go away? I know, everyone tells me that I’m smart and that there are lots of successful famous people with dyslexia.

Then they start listing Walt Disney, George Washington, Henry Ford and Thomas Edison and continue to say, “and look how these famous people with dyslexia changed the world.” I guess the look on my face said “huh?” because then they start naming people I actually know about.  [Read more…]